Contents

High Issue 1 / Low

Recap of PSNY® x NIKE AF1 Launch at 3 Howard

Lead with Us

@publicschoolnyc

A Letter From the Editors

We launched Public School in 2008, pre instagram and seemingly a lifetime ago. The fashion landscape then was unrecognizable from today’s new wave of inclusivity, rainbow runways and digital native start-ups. The hierarchy of eurocentric values and beauty standards was virtually impenetrable to any outsider who didn’t possess the proper pedigree. Without social media’s democratic magic wand the barrier of entry seemed bolted shut.

Against the odds, we set out to do menswear, or our version of it. We were two designers of color who came from a non-traditional background, having cut our teeth in “Urban Design,” a broad description often mistaken for “Streetwear” but ultimately created to pigeon-hole the talents of mostly black designers who held an aspirational yet utilitarian take on fashion. It was during these years, working under Sean Combs, when we decided that we wouldn't be defined by these boundaries.

Public School's first 4 collections were black and white. The palette was a symbol of practicality, a mission statement on minimalism and the consequence of being drawn to technical and suiting fabrics that all seemed to look better in monotone colors. We had the look before we had a name. It was about structured shoulders, asymmetric lines, tapered legs and loose knits, worn with sneakers, backward baseball caps and black leather perfecto jackets all in the name of moving around the city in ease and style. We eventually landed on Public School as the name because we wanted to create something synonymous with inclusion and convergence, which defined our experience growing up in NYC’s public school system. But we also loved the name because it presented an interesting proposition. How could we create something commercial but still incorporate a social consciousness that felt honest and real. The name Public School implies a sense of over achievement, of beating the odds and turning nothing into something. It’s why the name resonates with anyone who’s ever attended public school. But Public School also represents an exchange of ideas—the building upon an established foundation of experience to continually create something better. It’s the passing along of knowledge, as both student and teacher, in hopes of pushing forward a new conversation into culture and the creative lineage that connects us all at this moment in time.

With the launch of our new site we’re re-confirming the purpose of our original journey; to create a platform for a shared social consciousness. We believe that when you learn about something you become aware and that awareness ultimately can affect change. And just like when we broke down the industry doors with our brand of tailored streetwear, we’re continuing to pave a new path for people who look, talk and think like us.

Every month we’ll present a new “issue” full of engaging content where you’ll be able to read, watch and participate in all things inspiring and motivating us. Our debut issue entitled “Permanence” deals with the concept of iteration and the sustainability of new ideas and longevity in today’s fast moving times. Bobby Hundreds explains why the newest generation of brands isn’t thinking about the long term. Donnie Kwak discusses how the lack of permanence has crept into sports and why Lebron James helped end the idea of franchise players. Minya Oh writes about hip hop’s first geriatric moment and the widening gap between old and new. And our own in-house team talks about how the survival of the world as we know it starts with recycling your ideas and not your plastics. There’ll also be new product as well! Exclusive men’s and women’s products will drop regularly throughout the year and the only place you’ll find it is here at publicschoolnyc.com

We launched Public School in 2008, pre instagram and seemingly a lifetime ago. The fashion landscape then was unrecognizable from today’s new wave of inclusivity, rainbow runways and digital native start-ups. The hierarchy of eurocentric values and beauty standards was virtually impenetrable to any outsider who didn’t possess the proper pedigree. Without social media’s democratic magic wand the barrier of entry seemed bolted shut.

Against the odds, we set out to do menswear, or our version of it. We were two designers of color who came from a non-traditional background, having cut our teeth in “Urban Design,” a broad description often mistaken for “Streetwear” but ultimately created to pigeon-hole the talents of mostly black designers who held an aspirational yet utilitarian take on fashion. It was during these years, working under Sean Combs, when we decided that we wouldn't be defined by these boundaries.

Public School's first 4 collections were black and white. The palette was a symbol of practicality, a mission statement on minimalism and the consequence of being drawn to technical and suiting fabrics that all seemed to look better in monotone colors. We had the look before we had a name. It was about structured shoulders, asymmetric lines, tapered legs and loose knits, worn with sneakers, backward baseball caps and black leather perfecto jackets all in the name of moving around the city in ease and style. We eventually landed on Public School as the name because we wanted to create something synonymous with inclusion and convergence, which defined our experience growing up in NYC’s public school system. But we also loved the name because it presented an interesting proposition. How could we create something commercial but still incorporate a social consciousness that felt honest and real. The name Public School implies a sense of over achievement, of beating the odds and turning nothing into something. It’s why the name resonates with anyone who’s ever attended public school. But Public School also represents an exchange of ideas—the building upon an established foundation of experience to continually create something better. It’s the passing along of knowledge, as both student and teacher, in hopes of pushing forward a new conversation into culture and the creative lineage that connects us all at this moment in time.

With the launch of our new site we’re re-confirming the purpose of our original journey; to create a platform for a shared social consciousness. We believe that when you learn about something you become aware and that awareness ultimately can affect change. And just like when we broke down the industry doors with our brand of tailored streetwear, we’re continuing to pave a new path for people who look, talk and think like us.

Every month we’ll present a new “issue” full of engaging content where you’ll be able to read, watch and participate in all things inspiring and motivating us. Our debut issue entitled “Permanence” deals with the concept of iteration and the sustainability of new ideas and longevity in today’s fast moving times. Bobby Hundreds explains why the newest generation of brands isn’t thinking about the long term. Donnie Kwak discusses how the lack of permanence has crept into sports and why Lebron James helped end the idea of franchise players. Minya Oh writes about hip hop’s first geriatric moment and the widening gap between old and new. And our own in-house team talks about how the survival of the world as we know it starts with recycling your ideas and not your plastics. There’ll also be new product as well! Exclusive men’s and women’s products will drop regularly throughout the year and the only place you’ll find it is here at publicschoolnyc.com